Marshall Noice Oils, Pastel

Fall Color Willow Creek Pass
Fall Color Willow Creek Pass

Acrylic, 36inx60in, framed $7800

Storm Sky Over the Gros Ventre
Storm Sky Over the Gros Ventre

Oil, 36x24, framed Sold

Road out of Ovando
Road out of Ovando

Oil, 30x20, framed Sold

Early Fall
Early Fall

Oil, 30x20, framed Sold

Juniper Chimayo
Juniper Chimayo

Pastel,framed $1950

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Marshall Noice paints what he sees with a deep and abiding sense of joy. He passionately loves western landscapes, and he conveys that love through vibrant colors that illuminate the canvas and captivate the viewer's attention. Majestic golden aspen trees stand tall against a backdrop of magenta mountains. Richly painted evergreens invite an exploration of the ecosystem of higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains. Residents of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Noice's home state of Montana know the magnificent landscape he's portraying in his luscious works.

 

He has a way of painting what he sees with a deep and abiding sense of joyfulness. While painting is a natural form of expression for Noice, he began his artistic career as a photographer. In fact, he earned his living taking pictures for 23 years. Some of the work was figurative, but most of it was landscape photography. During the summer of 1977 he had the extreme privilege of being Ansel Adams' workshop assistant, an experience that profoundly affected his life. It happened at an auspicious time when Noice was just getting into photography. 'I feel that my experience in photography has helped me to develop a heightened sensibility toward landscapes.'

 

Marshall developed his signature technique from reading many art books and studying thousands of paintings. Using a “highly analytical” approach, Noice said he pinpointed what attracted him to a given painting, taking note of the composition, use of color and paint application technique.

 

Along with Wadell, Noice listed abstract expressionist artists Pierre Bonnard and Marc Rothko as major influences in developing his own intuitive and personal point of view.

 

Noice credits Joe Abbrescia with formalizing his approach to color in adding dissonant to complementary colors to create tension in a painting. Abbrescia called the technique analogous color harmony.